Photo of a power plug

How faulty RCDs can go unnoticed

Overlooking the importance of having working RCDs is a dangerous move.

As we’ve mentioned in a previous article, current state law requires that all houses for sale or rent have two Residual Currency Devices (RCDs) installed prior to settlement.

A recent settlement, however, demonstrated that this important requirement can sometimes slip through the cracks. Our client, a seller, believed they had the required RCDs installed and signed a declaration confirming as much. But they were mistaken.

When the new owner moved in and contracted an electrician for another project, they found that one of the devices was in fact not working. It emerged that the seller had it installed by an electrician friend (out of hours) – and it had not been wired correctly.

Sellers who don’t have the appropriate RCDs installed face fines of up to $15,000. Worse, a house without the appropriate devices puts its occupants at risk of electrocution.

When acting for a buyer, we request confirmation from the seller’s settlement agent that the property complies, but there is no legislation that compels them to provide this confirmation. As such, real estate agents should make their seller clients aware of the importance of having two working RCDs installed prior to settlement – thus helping to ensure a smooth selling experience.

Image by Blake Facey via Flickr.